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making the connection | November 22, 2020

November 24, 2020

But let justice roll on like a river, righteousness like a never-failing stream! – Amos 5:24

Sunday took us to another, less familiar Old Testament book: Amos. This is a book about justice and righteousness. God uses Amos to call out the injustice and hypocrisy He sees in Israel. While this book is about and to Israel, it is still full of good lessons for us today. It reveals God’s character and what He wants from His people. Because God doesn’t change, we know He still cares about injustice today. So, how can God use what we see in Amos and what Denny challenged us with on Sunday to teach us and lead us to do something about the injustice around us?

Because Amos isn’t a super familiar book, you might want to spend some time this week reading it. Amos is nine chapters long, so with a little effort, you should be able to read the whole thing this week. Before you read, spend some time in prayer. Ask God to guide this time of reflecting on His Word. Ask Him to provide clarity and help you focus during your time of study. After you read, use the Inductive Study Method prompts below to help you understand what you’re reading. And when you’re done reading and studying, spend more time in prayer asking God to show you what you can do about the injustice in our world right now.

Inductive Study Method Prompts

Observation: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How? What does it say? What do I notice?

Interpretation: What are the key themes or truths? What is the writer’s intended meaning? What is the context? What questions do I have?

Application: How do I apply it? What are the implications in my life? What does this mean for me?

You can also check out The Bible Project’s overview video of Amos here: https://youtu.be/mGgWaPGpGz4. It is an excellent resource for those who appreciate some visuals while learning.

Praise set

Christ Be Magnified (© Capitol CMG Paragon (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), Writer’s Roof Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Cory Asbury, written by  Capitol CMG Paragon (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), Writer’s Roof Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, CCLI #7139866)

See a Victory (© 2019 Fellow Ships Music (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), Music by Elevation Worship Publishing (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), So Essential Tunes (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Elevation Worship, written by Ben Fielding, Chris Brown, Jason Ingram, and Steven Furtick, CCLI #7129060)

It Is Well (© 2003 Thankyou Music, performed by Todd Fields, written by Philip Paul Bliss, Aaron Keyes, and Horatio G. Spafford, CCLI #5077281)

Bible Reading Plan | Devotion for the week of November 15, 2020

November 18, 2020

Weekly Reading: 2 Timothy 1-4; Titus 1
Passages Referenced: 2 Timothy 1:8; 3:11; 4:2, 6-7, 10-14, 17-18;
2 Corinthians 11:23-28; Isaiah 53:3

I can vividly remember some of my family members’ last words. Like when my uncle passed a few years ago – he couldn’t talk, but as soon as my aunt said one last, “I love you,” he groaned to say it back to her. Or right before my grandpa passed away a year ago, I can remember sitting there with him and my now-husband talking about the proper amount of sweetener to put in tea and hearing his childhood stories of walking to and from school with a shotgun 80 years ago. I’ll remember those last words forever.

While reading Paul’s second letter to his friend and ministry partner, Timothy, I realized these words were essentially Paul’s “last words.” In 2 Timothy 4:6-7, Paul says that “…the time of my departure has come. I have fought the good fight, I have finished the race, I have kept the faith.”

As I studied this letter, Paul’s eternal perspective on life was radiating off the pages. Rather than focusing on himself in his “last words,” he focuses on God and His Word. Paul continues to instruct Timothy on how to continue spreading the Gospel after his passing (see 2 Timothy 4:2). And from experience, Paul knows that with spreading the Good News of Jesus’ death and resurrection, comes suffering, prompting Paul to also warn Timothy of what may be to come. Paul encourages Timothy to “share in suffering for the Gospel.” (2 Timothy 1:8)

We have to remember that Paul was a prisoner when he wrote this letter. He had suffered through beatings, shipwrecks, imprisonments, danger, hunger, thirst, and anxiety throughout his missionary journeys (see 2 Corinthians 11:23-28). Not only that, but people failed Paul. In 2 Timothy 4:10-14, he lists companions who deserted him throughout his ministry: Demas, Crescens, Titus, and Alexander. He even goes on to say in verse 16 that, “at my first defense, no one came to stand by me, but all deserted me.” Paul knows what it looks like to suffer for the Gospel.

But where was God during Paul’s suffering? All you have to do is look at 2 Timothy 3:11 and 4:17 to see that God was always with Paul:

“The Lord rescued me.” (2 Timothy 3:11)
“The Lord stood by me.” (2 Timothy 4:17)
“The Lord strengthened me.” (2 Timothy 4:17)

When circumstances were unpredictable, God was steadfast. When people were unreliable, God was trustworthy. God promises never to abandon us, and Paul was living proof that God keeps His promises. With all that Paul lived through, at the end of his life, he still proclaimed, “the Lord will rescue me from every evil deed and bring me safely into His kingdom. To Him be the glory forever and ever.” (2 Timothy 4:18) Paul trusted God and wanted everyone to know and glorify Christ. Let’s take his “last words” to heart. – Madison Murphy

Take a few moments to reflect on the following:

  • Who remained with Paul during his imprisonment? What traits of God did you glean from these passages?
  • What is the importance of preaching the Gospel? Why do you think this was a main topic of Paul’s last letter to Timothy?
  • Think of a situation where you felt no one was on your side except for God. Take a moment to pray to God, praising and thanking Him for His steadfast love and support.
  • Think of a current struggle where you feel alone. Ask God to show you His comfort, love, and support through this hard time.
  • Read Isaiah 53:3 with Jesus in mind. How does this verse give you hope?

making the connection | November 15, 2020

November 18, 2020

God’s promises can be trusted because His plans have been proven. As we spend more time in God’s Word, we see that He is a promise maker and a promise keeper. God’s plans and promises run throughout scripture. And they can give us peace.

The book of Ruth is one such story. It’s a beautiful reminder of how God works in the midst of the hard stuff of life. In it, we see God being present in pain and uncertainty. It is a story of people trusting God. And that’s the response we should have amid difficult situations. We should surrender to God and trust that He is at work.

Make a point this week to read all of Ruth’s story. It’s four chapters long, so you can easily read the whole thing this week. Some of you may want to read it multiple times. And before you read, spend some time in prayer. Ask God to guide this time of reflecting on His Word. Ask Him to provide clarity and help you focus during your time of study. After you read, use the Inductive Study Method prompts below to help you understand what you’re reading.

Inductive Study Method Prompts

Observation: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How? What does it say? What do I notice?

Interpretation: What are the key themes or truths? What is the writer’s intended meaning? What is the context? What questions do I have?

Application: How do I apply it? What are the implications in my life? What does this mean for me?

You can also check out The Bible Project’s overview video of Ruth here: https://youtu.be/0h1eoBeR4Jk. It is an excellent resource for those who appreciate some visuals while learning.

Praise Set:

Yes and Amen (© Thankyou Music (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing) and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Chris Tomlin, written by Anthony Brown, Nate Moore, and Chris McClarney, CCLI #7048885)

Another in the Fire (© 2018 Hillsong Music Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), performed by Hillson United, written by Chris Davenport and Joel Houston, CCLI #7124907)

Tremble (© 2016 All Essential Music (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), Be Essential Songs (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), Bentley Street Songs (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), Mosaic LA Music (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), Mosaic MSC Music (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), and Upside Down Under (Admin. by Essential Music Publishing LLC), performed by Mosaic MSC, written by Andres Figueroa, Hank Bentley, Mariah McManus, Mia Fieldes, and Priscilla Houle, CCLI #7112299)

PJ’s & Bibles Project

November 12, 2020

For Sonlight’s Christmas offering project, we’re pleased to partner again with Combined Community Services (CCS). Together, we can help give hurting kids and families in our community a bit more joy at Christmas.

Please purchase a set of pajamas and a Bible that corresponds to the size and age of your own children. Don’t have any children, but want to participate? Larger sizes of Youth XL through Adult Medium sizes of pajamas are needed as well. Please bring your pajamas unwrapped to the drop-off locations in the lobby and outside the Sonlight classrooms, or have them delivered to WCC (Attn: Sonlight PJ’s, 1855 S County Farm Road, Warsaw, Indiana 46580) by Sunday, December 13.

For the Bibles, you can stop by the PJ’s & Bibles booth in the lobby on Sundays through December 13, or purchase from our online store, and we’ll take care of the delivery to CCS.

Sonlight recommends the following Bible versions:

*Got other things to purchase from Amazon? You can also order through our Amazon Wish List page, and have the Bibles shipped directly to CCS.

Please be sure to pray for the children that will receive these new pajamas and a Bible this Christmas.

Thank you for partnering with us to help kids go to bed warm and with God’s Word!

For more details or questions about WCC’s PJ’s & Bibles Sonlight Offering project, contact: Ruth Romeo(574) 268-0188 x242

NOTE: Adopt-a-Family is a community-wide Christmas initiative overseen by Combined Community Services. If you would like to adopt a family by purchasing and delivering gifts, please contact CCS online or at (574) 269-6019.

making the connection | November 8, 2020

November 11, 2020

Sunday may have been the first time you heard about Hosea and his wife, Gomer. If that’s the case, or if you haven’t read about them in a while, now is an excellent opportunity for you to spend some time unpacking their story. The book of Hosea has 14 chapters. That’s a bit much for some to read in a week. But we focused on verses from the first three chapters Sunday so you could stick to those as well. Commit to reading at least Hosea 1-3 this week. And before you read, spend some time in prayer. Ask God to guide this time of reflection on His Word. Ask Him to provide clarity and help you focus during your time of study. After you read, use the Inductive Study Method prompts below to help you understand what you’re reading.

Inductive Study Method Prompts

Observation: Who? What? Where? When? Why? How? What does it say? What do I notice?

Interpretation: What are the key themes or truths? What is the writer’s intended meaning? What is the context? What questions do I have?

Application: How do I apply it? What are the implications in my life? What does this mean for me?

And here are a couple more things you can look at to dig deeper into the book of Hosea:

Check out The Bible Project’s overview video of Hosea here: https://youtu.be/kE6SZ1ogOVU. It is an excellent resource for those who appreciate some visuals while learning.

Read the excerpt below from the NIV Study Bible on the theological theme and message of Hosea:

The first part of the book (chs. 1-3) narrates the family life of Hosea as a symbol (similar to the symbolism in the lives of Isaiah, Jeremiah, and Ezekiel) to convey the message the prophet had from the Lord for his people. God ordered Hosea to marry an adulterous wife, Gomer, and their three children were each given a symbolic name representing part of the ominous message. Ch. 2 alternates between Hosea’s relation to Gomer and its symbolic representation of God’s relation to Israel. The children are told to drive the unfaithful mother out of the house; but it was her reform, not her riddance, that was sought. The prophet was ordered to continue loving her, and he took her back and kept her in isolation for a while (ch. 3). The affair graphically represents the Lord’s relation to the Israelites (cf. 2:4,9,18), who had been disloyal to him by worshipping Canaanite deities as the source of their abundance. Israel was to go through a period of exile (cf. 7:16; 9:3,6,17; 11:5). But the Lord still loved his covenant people and longed to take them back, just as Hosea took back Gomer. This return is described with imagery recalling the exodus from Egypt and settlement in Canaan (cf. 1:11; 2:14-23; 3:5; 11:10-11; 14:4-7). Hosea saw Israel’s past experiences with the Lord as the fundamental pattern, or type, of God’s future dealings with his people.

praise set:

The Lord Our God (© 2013 sixsteps Music, worshiptogether.com songs, and Sony/ATV Timber Publishing, performed by Kristian Stanfill, written by 2013 sixsteps Music, worshiptogether.com songs, and Sony/ATV Timber Publishing, CCLI #6518055)

Goodness of God (© 2018 Alletrop Music (Admin. by Music Services, Inc.) and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Bethel Music, written by Ed Cash and Jenn Johnson, CCLI #7117726)

King of My Heart (© Meaux Jeaux Music (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), Raucous Ruckus Publishing (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing), and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by John Mark McMillan, written by John Mark McMillan and Sarah McMillan, CCLI #7046145)

Always (©  worshiptogether.com songs, sixsteps Music, Sony/ATV Timber Publishing, and Windsor Hill Music, performed by Kristian Stanfill, written by Jason Ingram and Kristian Stanfill, CCLI #5881037)

Bible Reading Plan | Devotion for the week of November 1, 2020

November 5, 2020

Weekly Reading: 1 Thessalonians 5; 2 Thessalonians 1-3; 1 Timothy 1
Passage Referenced: 1 Timothy 1:15-17

15Here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance: Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners—of whom I am the worst. 16But for that very reason I was shown mercy so that in me, the worst of sinners, Christ Jesus might display his immense patience as an example for those who would believe in him and receive eternal life. 17Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory for ever and ever. Amen. – 1 Timothy 1:15-17

If you’ve been following our Bible Reading Plan this year, what Paul is saying to Timothy in the verses above is nothing new. We’ve seen Paul say similar things over and over again in just about all of his other letters we’ve read so far. And the reason for that should be clear to us now. Just like Paul, we were sinners, whom Christ saved. And that only happened because of God’s grace and mercy towards us. We didn’t earn that salvation; it was a free gift.

I love how Paul sets this truth up: “here is a trustworthy saying that deserves full acceptance.” (v15) That opening functions as a reminder that what follows is simple, important, and something we should remember and accept. I also appreciate how Paul points out in verse 16 that Jesus’ transformative work in our lives can be an example for others who don’t know Him yet. We can reflect God’s patience, love, mercy, and grace. But the question is, do we do that? Do we live in a way that fosters transparency and honesty? Do we show others our shortcomings, mistakes, failures, and limitations? And do we live in a way that reflects God’s goodness, power, love, kindness, and presence?

I want the answer to those questions to be yes. But I fear that’s not always the case. Maybe that’s because we want to appear put together, or we don’t want to appear weak. Whatever the reason, we often wear masks (no, not the COVID kind) where we hide the truth of what’s really going on.

But think about what it’s like when you catch a glimpse of others being real. It’s refreshing and encouraging, right? And we can often easily judge whether others are being fake or authentic with us. But somehow, we think we can get away with faking to others, that they won’t notice. But that’s obviously not true. They can see that something isn’t right. So why do we keep hiding and pretending that everything is ok? When we do that, are we limiting God? Are we limiting the witness of His kindness, love, and grace? Yeah.

So how could God use us and our vulnerability to reach the world around us? It seems easier said than done, right? Yeah, it is if we’re trying to do it on our own. But our faith journey is about surrender. When we surrender to God, the Spirit goes to work, growing and shaping us. And using us to reflect God to those around us. Surrender is hard, but it is worth it – for us and the world around us. Just imagine what could happen if we surrendered to the “King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God” (v17), and let Him work. We really would bring “honor and glory [to Him] for ever and ever. Amen.” (v17) – Sarah Neel

Live Concert Saturday for Orphan Care

November 5, 2020

Religion that God our father accepts as pure and faultless is this: to care for orphans and widows in their distress and to keep oneself unpolluted by the world. (James 1:27)

As part of the Coalition of Churches for Orphan Care in Kosciusko County, Warsaw Community Church and our partner churches and organizations working to raise awareness and hope for orphan and vulnerable children in our community, are proud to present For the Fatherless, a worship duo from Nashville, Tennessee to a live, outdoor concert at Pleasant View Bible Church (2782 W 200 N, Warsaw Indiana, 574-269-1562) on Saturday, November 7, from 6:30-8pm. Attendees are asked to dress warm and bring their own chairs.

The Coalition of Churches for Orphan Care currently includes Christ’s Covenant Church, First Christian Church, Grace College Serve Ministries, Milford First Brethren Church, Mission Point Community Church, New Life Christian Church & World Outreach, Pleasant View Bible Church, Raise the Dough, Village to Village International, Warsaw Community Church, and Winona Lake Grace Brethren Church. Each church and organization, although different in some of their teaching or practices, agree that Jesus loves orphans and vulnerable children and have come together to share their resources and talents to support the care of hurting children in Kosciusko County.

The coalition would like to point out that November is National Adoption Awareness Month, and includes Orphan & Stand Sundays, pointing to the needs and support for adoption and foster families.

If you have any questions about adoption or foster care, check out WCC’s Adoption Support Group, which meets at 3pm, the second Sunday of odd month’s (January, March, May, July, September and November) at Warsaw Community Church. For more information about WCC’s efforts to help orphan and vulnerable children, contact: Brandon Schmitt.

making the connection | November 1, 2020

November 4, 2020

As we wrapped up our series From Graves to Gardens on Sunday, Todd reminded us of the truth we can cling to from Romans 8 – the truth of our reality because of what Christ did for us. Spend some time now reading through the truths found in the verses below. As you read, think about which truths you need to be reminded of most often and why you think that’s the case. Spend some time in prayer, asking God to continue teaching you from His Word and reminding you that He loves you and that these verses really are true.

No condemnation
So now there is no condemnation for those who belong to Christ Jesus. – Romans 8:1

No fear
So you have not received a spirit that makes you fearful slaves. Instead, you received God’s Spirit when he adopted you as his own children. Now we call him, “Abba, Father.” – Romans 8:15

No despair
Yet what we suffer now is nothing compared to the glory he will reveal to us later. For all creation is waiting eagerly for that future day when God will reveal who his children really are. Against its will, all creation was subjected to God’s curse. But with eager hope, the creation looks forward to the day when it will join God’s children in glorious freedom from death and decay. – Romans 8:18-21

No calamity
And we know that God causes everything to work together for the good of those who love God and are called according to his purpose for them. – Romans 8:28

No adversary
What shall we say about such wonderful things as these? If God is for us, who can ever be against us? Since he did not spare even his own Son but gave him up for us all, won’t he also give us everything else? – Romans 8:31-32

No accusation
Who dares accuse us whom God has chosen for his own? No one—for God himself has given us right standing with himself. Who then will condemn us? No one—for Christ Jesus died for us and was raised to life for us, and he is sitting in the place of honor at God’s right hand, pleading for us. – Romans 8:33-34

No defeat
Can anything ever separate us from Christ’s love? Does it mean he no longer loves us if we have trouble or calamity, or are persecuted, or hungry, or destitute, or in danger, or threatened with death?… No, despite all these things, overwhelming victory is ours through Christ, who loved us. – Romans 8:35, 37

No separation
And I am convinced that nothing can ever separate us from God’s love. Neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither our fears for today nor our worries about tomorrow—not even the powers of hell can separate us from God’s love. No power in the sky above or in the earth below—indeed, nothing in all creation will ever be able to separate us from the love of God that is revealed in Christ Jesus our Lord.– Romans 8:38-39

Praise set:

Raise a Hallelujah (© Bethel Music Publishing, performed by Bethel Music, written by Jake Stevens, Jonathan Helser, Melissa Helser, and Molly Skaggs, CCLI #7119315)

Graves Into Gardens (© 2019 Maverick City Publishing Worldwide (Admin. by Heritage Worship Publishing), Bethel Music Publishing, and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Elevation Worship, written by Brandon Lake, Chris Brown, Steven Furtick, and Tiffany Hammer, CCLI #7138219)

The Wonderful Cross (© 2000 worshiptogether.com songs\sixsteps Music (Admin. by EMI Christian Music Publishing)\(Admin. by EMI Christian Music Publishing), performed by WCC, written by Tomlin, Chris \ Watts, Isaac \ Walt, J. D. \ Reeves, Jesse \ Mason, Lowell, CCLI #3148435)

In Christ Alone (© 2001 Thankyou Music, performed by Kristian Stanfill, written by Keith Getty and Stuart Townend, CCLI #3350395)

Glorious Day (© Sean Curran Publishing Designee, sixsteps Music, Sixsteps Songs, Worship Together Music, worshiptogether.com songs, Fellow Ships Music, Hickory Bill Doc, So Essential Tunes, performed by Passion featuring Kristian Stanfill, written by Kristian Stanfill, Jason Ingram, Jonathan Smith & Sean Curran, CCLI #7081388)

Bible Reading Plan | Devotion for the week of October 18, 2020

October 20, 2020

Weekly Reading: Philippians 3-4, Colossians 1-3
Passage Referenced: Colossians 3:16

Have you ever thought about how weird it would be if life were like a musical? What if we randomly broke out in song to express our situation or our feelings with one another, like a scene from Zoey’s Extraordinary Playlist? Or take, for instance, the popular musical Les Misérables that has inspired and moved audiences around the world since its French debut in 1980. The story of redemption and reconciliation set to music has connected to the core of the human experience and has been known for evoking strong emotions. In its most recent 2012 appearance on-screen, Les Misérables had people openly weeping in the theater.

What is it about a great story put into song that strikes us with such emotion? Could it be that we were created to sing about our story of redemption and reconciliation? I’m not suggesting we go through life singing as if we were in a musical. However, I wonder if this is the essence of what the Apostle Paul was encouraging the gathered Church to do in Colossians 3:16:

Let the message of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another with all wisdom through psalms, hymns, and songs from the Spirit, singing to God with gratitude in your hearts. 

The Early Church didn’t have access to the Bible like we do today. Teachings about Jesus would be passed from person to person, household to household, and church to church, through “hymns, psalms, and songs from the Spirit.” They would teach each other about the message of Christ in musical form. A large part of Christian education and discipleship was done through song. The same is true for the Church today. How else would we know that “Father Abraham had many sons, and many sons had Father Abraham, and I am one of them, and so are you, so let’s just praise the Lord. (right arm)…”

We can teach each other about the goodness and faithfulness of God through songs we sing in corporate worship. As a worship pastor, I take great delight in hearing the congregation sing with me the truths about Christ. Not only are we singing to God, but also to one another. The next time you sing in church, reflect on the words, look around you, and listen to the voices. Let the message and the melody of the Gospel sink deep into your heart. – Nick Stanton

Fantine: Come with me, where chains will never bind you. All your grief, at last, at last behind you. Lord in heaven, look down on him in mercy.

Valjean: Forgive me all my trespasses and take me to your glory.

Fantine, Valjean, & Eponine: Take my hand, and lead me to salvation. Take my love, for love is everlasting. And remember, the truth that once was spoken: to love another person is to see the face of God.

From “Finale” – Les Misérables

Additional scripture references: Psalm 95:1, 96:1, 149:1; Ephesians 5:19-20

making the connection | October 18, 2020

October 20, 2020

“All suffering, all pain, all emptiness, all disappointment is seed: sow it in God and He will, finally, bring a crop of joy from it.” –Eugene Peterson

What we usually imagine is that the moment we put our trust in Jesus, life will be carefree. Joy and peace and goodness will stick to us like dog hair on dress pants. When we experience pain and disappointment, we tend to feel that we have been abandoned. This is when we need to see that our God is with us in suffering and know that He will use whatever comes our way to shape us into His image. As George Macdonald said, “The Son of God suffered unto the death, not that men might not suffer, but that their sufferings might be like His.”

In Romans 8:13-27, we discover that God alone can give us the resources we need to endure and overcome our sufferings. This weekend we heard about the critical importance of prayer, the pattern of Christ, and having an eternal perspective. Devote some time this week to reading and reflecting on one or more of the following Scriptures and questions to help you stand firm amid hardships in this life. –Nate Metler

Prayer – Read Psalm 130 through a few times slowly. What exactly does the psalm call us to do as we turn to God in prayer? What specifically does the psalm remind us about God’s character and His response?

Pattern – Read Luke 9:22-24. What was Jesus’ larger purpose in going to the cross? And how does that help us understand the importance of following His humble example in our daily lives?

Perspective – Read Revelation 21:1-6. What encouragement does this passage offer those who are suffering today? How can seeking an eternal perspective help us through difficulties in our lives?

praise set:

Great is Thy Faithfulness (© 1923. Renewed 1951 Hope Publishing Company, Words:  Hope Publishing Company, and Music: 1923. Renewed 1951 Hope Publishing Company, performed by Lincoln Brewster, written by Thomas Obediah Chisholm and William Marion Runyan, CCLI #18723)

Yes and Amen (© Thankyou Music (Admin. by Capitol CMG Publishing) and Remaining portion is unaffiliated, performed by Chris Tomlin, written by Anthony Brown, Nate Moore, and Chris McClarney, CCLI #7048885)

Way Maker (© 2016 Sinach (Admin. by SLIC Inspire), performed by Leeland, written by Osinachi Kalu Okoro Egbu, CCLI #7115744)

No Longer Slaves (2014 ©  Bethel Music Publishing, performed by Bethel Music, written by Jonathan David Helser and Melissa Helser, CCLI #7030123)